Best Places To Hunt Turkey In Colorado

Best Places To Hunt Turkey In Colorado – Eastern Colorado Outdoors has access to some beautiful turkey country. The type of bird we hunt in eastern Colorado is the Rio Grande. The beautiful birds have coppery green feathers. The tip of the tail and back feathers are light. The area we hunt is called the Big Sandy, which is mostly a dry riverbed and winds its way from west to east through Colorado. The Big Sand offers a large number of dead bogs that provide excellent turkey habitat. Turkey numbers in Colorado have held steady, if not increased, allowing hunters to pursue large, mature birds. Hunting pressure is very light in the area, which is great news for young turkey hunters or hunters with children, as the birds respond well to decoys and calls. Another great advantage we have at Eastern Colorado Outdoors is our ability to build different birds every day. We can walk along the river with our glasses of bird feeders, allowing us to see where they go and feed, and go out in front of them with a chain of deception and set up!

In addition to Great Sandy turkey hunting, ECO has access to turkey hunting east along the Kansas line in units 102, 103 or along the Arikkaree & Republican River watersheds. These areas resemble the habitat types of the Great Sandy. The first difference in the country is that the river bed is not dry. There will usually be a small amount of water on the ground, along with cotton and wheat. The river bed has tall grasses and scrubby red grass with grass on either side of the river. Most of these areas will have farmland that will approach the riverbed on either side, with corn, wheat, alfalfa or sorghum. Talk about a bird magnet.

Best Places To Hunt Turkey In Colorado

Just 2 weeks ago I took my 3 sons with a guy who is the same age as my oldest son. We had over 40 birds working along the edge of the ground, with a few males standing around a group of chickens. We immediately decided to move quickly away from the birds to approach them within 300 meters. There I quickly set up some wicked chickens with Jake working on one of the mushrooms. He transferred 25 years and is ready to pay. I placed the 2nd boy myself 25 yards from the gun to give a little call away from the shooter, and here’s a little cover we have at this point. All five of us are in camouflage gear, but I also know that escaping with 5 bodies is not easy no matter how much cover you have. I called after everyone had settled down and found a fire gobbler not only 200-250 yards away. The big bird didn’t need verbal help as I saw him and soon after the call he ran towards us. He stops to eat, looks around a bit and collapses on the floor again. I pointed to my oldest son, the shot in the rock, and quickly pointed my finger towards Tom so they could see the older boy as well. My son quickly understood my hand signal because we had done it thousands of times while calling hunters, so as not to shake anything. They also caught the bird, the 5 of us looked at the old bird and they ran and made a show. We let him roam as much as possible and when he started to get scared, Hawk, my oldest son, let him. I couldn’t have given Huck better instructions if I was sitting next to him. He took the bird just as the gig was about to end! You can see the body shape of the bird is starting, because I think it has 2 small cubs. One to my left, “Dad” and one to the right, “Tack”. It’s an honor for a father to go out with his family, but it’s a special time to see how his son uses the things he’s got and the things he’s given him in the field, like reading the body language of what we call. trophy! Watching all the hunters we’ve invited since he was 6 years old to now 18 and a high school senior has taught him many important lessons, the most important of which is when to shoot! Turkey Hunting in Colorado – Great Unusual Hunting! Gary Hubbell, ALC (General Land Consultant), Realtree Land Pro, Broker/Auctioneer May 22, 2020

Why Hunt Mountain Merriam’s? (part I)

When people think of hunting in Colorado, they usually think of Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, and maybe a swift antelope. “Wild turkeys” rarely come to mind. Surprisingly, however, Colorado has excellent turkey options, and the state offers a variety of options on both public and private land.

Most of the hunters who died came from eastern states where the eastern turkey was king. If you study what kind of type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type i type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type type almost half of the country is Eastern Turkey. Merriam’s turkey is dominant in Colorado, especially on the Western Slope, which is the part of the state west of the Continental Divide. The Merriam is similar to other American turkey breeds, with a few interesting differences. Toms can grow large—up to 30 pounds—but usually have shorter beards and spurs than Eastern turkeys. They don’t explode like other types of turkey and it can be difficult to tell. While the other species have a soft color bordering the end of the tail fan, the Merriam has a diamond-colored border on the tail fan.

Just as big game hunters look for the “grand slam” on a big buck or big North American game, turkey hunters like to put Merriam’s fan on the wall. What better place to hunt than Colorado, where you can hunt with snow-capped peaks in the background? When I was a kid growing up in rural western Colorado, it was rare to see a wild turkey. The old folks will talk about them and you’ll see “Turkey Creek” on a lot of maps, but they’re not that many. In the 1970s and 1980s, large numbers of turkeys were released throughout the state, and the flock was managed. Now wild turkey is a sight to behold. In most parts of Colorado, with the exception of some game control areas north of I-70 in the western part of the state, turkey licenses can be purchased over the counter.

While eastern hunters may look for dense forests or open green meadows, Colorado turkey hunters have some unusual places to conquer in search of Merriam’s turkeys. I recently reviewed and called wild birds in a large rock formation above a bubbling stream with snowy mountains in the background. Down on the river bed, the mating geese are haunted; The farmer was angry in the pit of the neighbor’s house; And ducks meeting each other as they prepare to build a nest in the tall grass on the edge of a quiet pond. and turkeys. As we entered the calling area, I swooped down and killed some chickens, they flashed and went into the hole below. They wandered for a few hundred yards before coming to rest on a dry hill about 300 feet below me. Really new!

Out Of State Turkey Hunting On A Budget

What kind of soil do Colorado turkeys prefer? First of all, if there is no water nearby, you are probably wasting your time. Turks seem to be near a river or stream. A tall cottonwood is a favorite resting place, and cottonwood is found near water. They like to roam the spruce forests, looking for insects and lizards to eat, but one of their favorite foods is acorns from the gumbel oak tree, which is widespread in Colorado. The “forest oak,” as it is known, can grow to 30-40 feet, but in most places it grows 8-15 feet. It is very dense, wooden and makes walking difficult when trying to get into the forest. River bottoms with tall cottonwoods, open pastures and grasses are best for turkeys. Of course, if there are human temptations nearby, such as apples that have fallen from the orchard, spilled grain or crops, they will use this as well. The lowest elevation in Colorado is still above 4,000 feet, and turkey hunters must stay at that elevation.

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